Views of Betty’s Bay


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Main road into Betty’s Bay. Pringle Bay approach.

There are many aspects of life in Betty’s Bay, which are worthwhile exploring. Looking across the fence, there is an artist’s studio and next to him a chef, former owner of the then only worthwhile restaurant in the immediate area, now a full time chocolatier; next to us a couple retired as we are, she a top notch quilter and her good husband a garagiste in the true sense of the word, pressing, maturing and bottling red blends in his garage, just enough for his and his friends enjoyment and down the road, friends of ours, an architect and former art teacher. Not to count a number of academics and the many gifted and highly specialized artisans and artists – all retired and leading by all accounts, varied and interesting lives.

In the 19th and 20th century until the mid-50’s it was whale hunting – the main attraction these days is the area’s rich plant life, as part of the Cape Fynbos Kogelberg Biosphere recognised by UNESCO and globally acclaimed for its diversity in flora and fauna. Leopards, lynx, buck, flamingoes, pelicans and other water fowl abound, dolphins and whales visit the shores with regularity. And so we could go one. But there is something else: there is the wind. The South-Easter in summer, the North-Westerly in winter. Betty’s Bay is the windy corner of this part of the coast and often in summer weather builds up against the mountains, leaving us with an overcast sky and a cool breeze while not 10 kms away it is blue skies and happy sunshine. That has kept Betty’s Bay out of the limelight and the mainstream of tourists. And we are not promoting it to the contrary. We love our lonely walks on the beaches and the odd surfer or fisherman. The summer holidays see an influx of people, good enough to keep the small businesses afloat for the rest of the year, but otherwise Betty’s Bay is an unassuming 10 km strip of seemingly higgledy-piggledy variedly shaped, sized and coloured dwellings thrown about between sea and mountainside and no-one driving through on casual glance is likely to perceive any kind of particular quaintness …

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Yesterday we took our grandson Luke for a stroll around the block – taking pictures of some of the views Betty’s Bay may offer on a cold winter’s day in late afternoon light:

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Further down seaping into the ocean – habitat of the Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis).
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An architect’s abode.

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Colleen with our grandson Luke at the Lakeside.

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Tucked into the fynbos.

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Candelabra aloes (Aloe arborescens).

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Sun setting behind Blesberg.

A few views of Betty’s Bay – with love as always
from Walter & Colleen
Wednesday, 17 July 2013

2 comments on “Views of Betty’s Bay

  1. jayantadeepa says:

    Lovely pictures … looks like a beautiful place to go and relax

  2. The Rider says:

    One of my favourite biking routes- the R44! One of the headers of my blog was taken on the road to Bettiesbay! Thanks, beautiful photos!

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